Purchase Ticket Now Available for purchase
Spring 2018
Did you know that
since 2006 the show
has donated more
than $370,000 to local
non-profit organizations?

Did you know that
since 2006 the show
has donated more
than $700,000 to more
than 60 nonprofit
organizations?



Cavanaugh Flight Museum

Cavanaugh Flight Museum

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum, situated in Dallas, Texas, is bringing several planes and helicopters to the Bell Helicopter Fort Worth Alliance Air Show including the Bell-47, P-51 Mustang, AD-5, A-1 Skyraider (formerly AD-6) and F4U Corsair. These represent some of the most well-known combat aircraft in aviation history. 

The Bell-47, was also used during the Korean War when 13 helicopters were adapted for medical evacuations. The television show M*A*S*H* made the Sioux widely recognizable due to the shows portrayal of the helicopter’s use during the Korean War. 

The P-51 Mustang is perhaps the most well-known aircraft of all time. The British requested their design at the beginning of WWII and over 15,000 were made. This single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber was used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. Many of the P-51s were made in Grand Prairie, Texas. 

The Douglas AD-5, a Korean War era plane, was the backbone of ground attacks. It proved itself very useful due to its powerful engine and fuel load which gave the plane a large combat radius. The plane again proved itself to be very useful in the Vietnam War, which is when the planes affectionately became known as “Sandys.” 

The Douglas A-1 Skyraider (formerly AD) is an American single-seat attack aircraft that saw service between the late 1940s and early 1980s. The Skyraider had a remarkably long and successful career; it became a piston-powered, propeller-driven anachronism in the jet age, and was nicknamed "Spad", after the French World War I fighter. 

The F4U Corsair is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. The Corsair's distinctive sound, which earned it among the Japanese the nick-name of "Whistling Death", partly because of the engine sound, that was caused by the wing-root inlets for engine air.